Dr. Strangelove or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb

Released: January 29, 1964
Budget: NA
US Box Office: $9 million
Global Box Office: NA

Director: Stanley Kubrick
Cast: Peter Sellers, George C. Scott, Sterling Hayden, James Earl Jones, Keenan Wynn

Synopsis: The US goverment scrambles to keep from accidentally starting a nuclear war.
Best Quote: "I admit the human element seems to have failed us here"

Review: 3.5 stars

Every movie fan owes it to himself to see this movie.

I'm not sure quite how he does it, but Stanley Kubrick manages to infuse this Cold War satire with the perfect amount of absurdity. If it got much goofier the movie would risk slipping into Airplane! territory...hilarious but nevertheless meaningless. As it stands, Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb is laugh-out-loud funny and still worth watching in any post-WWII history class. Heavy doses of humor don't mean that this one is light-hearted; this is a dark comedy through and through. So much so that the Air Force insisted Kubrick include a disclaimer in the opening credits assuring American moviegoers that the events in the movie couldn't happen. In the end, the government's reassurance only adds to the movie's creepiness. The sequence of events is just plausible enough to convince you that we're just a slipup away from getting ourselves blown up. I can only imagine how the audience reacted when this came out just 2 years after the Cuban Missile Crisis.

Aside from the overall creepy feel of the movie, Strangelove also has some of the best singular moments in disaster films. My favorite is when the President (Peter Sellers) has to humor a drunk Soviet president ("Of course I like to speak to you!") when calling to tell him nukes are headed his way. I was laughing through the entire conversation even though I was anxious as hell in the back of my mind. Haven't had that sensation in too many other movies, which is just another reason why this one is special.